A wonderful day celebrating Afghan women and honoring their stories.  In Ridgewood, NJ.

You and I, We Deserve Love: Afghan Women Write | The Fetzer Institute

I was asked by the Fetzer Institute to write something to celebrate National Poetry Month.  If you have a moment, click through.  The poems will move you.  Click thru to the @awwproject.org website and you will be changed.

Seen in NY: The Afghan Women's Writing Project

EdLab attended our reading in Richmond Hill, Queens and then made this 2 minute video.  Check it out!

Harlem Against Violence & Homophobia

Parents in Harlem banded together to raise money for the Ali Forney Center which helps homeless LGBTQ youth. We were sparked to act in   protest of the ATLAH Ministry sign on Lenox Avenue.  I am loathe to repeat what was posted on that sign, but I will say that it suggested that Jesus Christ called for the public murder of gay people.  For a long time we gritted our teeth and did our best to ignore the ravings on ATLAH’s signs, but we cannot bear this and simply pretend that these words weren’t said.We’re now on day 9 of our fundraising and awareness drive.   We had a modest goal: $1000.  As of 1:40pm, we’re at $2446 with 72 donors.  Would you help us keep the momentum going?

http://harlemagainstviolencehomophobia.mydagsite.com/home

A princess I can believe in.  She won the night.

A princess I can believe in.  She won the night.

The saddest and most beautiful mural I’ve ever seen.  In East Harlem.  ”When You Feel Lonely, Place Hand Here”

The saddest and most beautiful mural I’ve ever seen.  In East Harlem.  ”When You Feel Lonely, Place Hand Here”

“I always physically felt like an outsider. I didn’t look like anyone else. But I think, and I think many writers probably feel this, I felt more like an outsider in terms of my empathy and the way I liked to observe everything. I was slow and thoughtful in a way that people perhaps mistook for being very daydreamy.
I feel like I belong when I walk on the prairie. Nature is very fair to all. There’s no judgment.” - Author Nina McConigley

To read more of my HuffPost piece on her book Cowboys and East Indians as well as our interview, go here.

I always physically felt like an outsider. I didn’t look like anyone else. But I think, and I think many writers probably feel this, I felt more like an outsider in terms of my empathy and the way I liked to observe everything. I was slow and thoughtful in a way that people perhaps mistook for being very daydreamy.

I feel like I belong when I walk on the prairie. Nature is very fair to all. There’s no judgment.” - Author Nina McConigley

To read more of my HuffPost piece on her book Cowboys and East Indians as well as our interview, go here.

Love, Forgiveness, and Pens With Blue Wings: A Curriculum

Are you a teacher or a group leader of any kind, or just interested in going deeper into love, forgiveness in your own life?  Read about the AWWP Love and Forgiveness curriculum.  Contact me at stacy at awwproject.org and I will send PDF or hard copy.

STACY. USA. DREAM CHASER. – Empower Media

As a black American woman, I had the luck to born of a time and place that has allowed me to speak and write freely.  There is always risk, of course.  Any time I speak out I risk upsetting family, friends, employers, the powers-that-be.  Yet, no one is actively trying to censor me.  I don’t fear the Gestapo outside the door, or the white employers of the town will seal my fate because of my statements.  I don’t feel that if I say the wrong words I will be shunned from my family or banished by my community. So many men and women who came before me had to master codes in order to speak—they were forced to talk in riddles and artfully hide the true meaning of their words, living a life of constant plausible deniability…”